Kathryn N. Ivey, PhD

Staff Research Investigator

Phone: (415) 734-2706
Fax: (415) 355-0141
Fewer scientific details, please
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Other Professional Titles

Director, Gladstone Stem Cell Core

Investigator, Roddenberry Center for Stem Cell Biology and Medicine at Gladstone

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco

Executive Assistant

Bethany Taylor
(415) 734-2716
btaylor@gladstone.ucsf.edu

More about Dr. Ivey

Dr. Ivey’s research focuses on the regulation of cardiac-cell fates. She uses both animal models and cultured cells to study normal and pathological developmental processes. As the Director of the Gladstone Stem Cell Core, she oversees training, equipment and other resources for cutting-edge stem cell research used both by investigators at both Gladstone and UCSF.

Dr. Ivey came to Gladstone as a Postdoctoral Scholar in 2005, and trained in stem cell biology as a California Institute for Regenerative Medicine Scholar for three years. During that time, she applied her knowledge of the processes governing normal heart development to direct the differentiation of embryonic stem cells into the cardiac lineage.

In 1998, Dr. Ivey earned a bachelor’s degree at Texas A&M University. In 2004, she earned a PhD in molecular and cell biology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, where she studied transcriptional regulation of the developing heart.

 

More scientific details, please

Other Professional Titles

Director, Gladstone Stem Cell Core

Investigator, Roddenberry Center for Stem Cell Biology and Medicine at Gladstone

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco

Executive Assistant

Bethany Taylor
(415) 734-2716
btaylor@gladstone.ucsf.edu

Areas of Investigation

The heart develops and functions through the precise actions of myriad factors at specific moments in response to signaling and transcriptional networks. microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, regulate the dosage of such factors and are critical contributors to cardiac development and function. Building on my published work, which uncovered the role of miRNAs in various cardiogenic processes—including formation of cardiac cells from embryonic stem cells—I am continuing in two major areas of investigation: 1) Directed differentiation of cardiovascular cells from human ES and iPS cells and 2) Posttranscriptional regulation of miRNA activity.

Current Lab Focus

  • What are the extracellular matrix proteins that promote human iPS cell differentiation into various cardiovascular lineages?
  • What are the mechanisms for post-transcriptional regulation of bicistronic cardiac miRNAs?
  • What is the role of specific RNA binding proteins in controlling the activity of cardiac and skeletal muscle miRNAs?

Joined Gladstone

2009

Why Gladstone?

Gladstone offers a unique environment that brings together strong, talented scientists performing at the cutting edge of basic research, while also creating the opportunity for them to work together under the umbrella of a specific human disease focus, applying their science to solve questions about important illnesses of our time. Gladstone also values community outreach and I am thankful to be part of our efforts to share current science with members of the public and especially local youth.

Key Achievements

  • Uncovered the ability of cardiac-enriched miRNAs to direct cardiac differentiation from pluripotent embryonic stem cells.
  • Developed an automated miRNA target prediction algorithm, helping to uncover the role of miRNAs in the formation of cardiac cells.

Education

Texas A&M University (BS), Molecular & Cell Biology (1998)
UT Southwestern Medical Center (PhD), Molecular & Cell Biology (2004)

Affiliations

International Society for Stem Cell Research
American Association for the Advancement of Science
Gladstone Minority and Youth Outreach Committee, Co-chair

Awards

  • Davis Scholarship (1994)
  • Baumberger Endowment Four-Year Scholarship (1994)
  • Distinguished Student Award, Texas A&M University (1997)
  • Annual Poster Session Award, UTSW Graduate Student Organization (2002)
  • Travel Scholarship, UTSW Graduate Student Organization (2004)
  • Outstanding Poster Award, UCSF Cardiovascular Research Institute (2005)
  • Anne H. Snyder “Award of Excellence,” Gladstone Institutes (2007)
  • Winner, International Society for Stem Cell Research Educational Video Competition (2009)
  • Distinguished Service Award, Gladstone Institutes (2009)
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Featured Publications

Kathy Ivey, PhDSheehy NT, Cordes KR, White MP, Ivey KN, Srivastava D. The neural crest-enriched microRNA miR-452 regulates epithelial-mesenchymal signaling in the first pharyngeal arch. Development. 2010 Dec; 137(24):4307-16. View in: PubMed
Kathy Ivey, PhDPark CY, Pierce SA, von Drehle M, Ivey KN, Morgan JA, Blau HM, Srivastava D. skNAC, a Smyd1-interacting transcription factor, is involved in cardiac development and skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Nov 30; 107(48):20750-5. View in: PubMed