Recent Advances

April 25, 2012

Warner C. Greene, MD, PhD—who directs virology and immunology research at the Gladstone Institutes—has won the 2012 Alumni Achievement Award from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (WUSTL).

April 18, 2012

Time magazine has named Gladstone Senior Investigator Robert Grant, MD, MPH, to the 2012 TIME 100, the magazine's annual list of the world's 100 most influential people.

December 21, 2011

Gladstone Institutes scientist Nevan Krogan, PhD, today is announcing research that identifies how HIV—the virus that causes AIDS—hijacks the body’s own defenses to promote infection. This discovery could one day help curb the spread of the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

December 14, 2011

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have discovered new protein fragments in semen that enhance the ability of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, to infect new cells—a discovery that one day could help curb the global spread of this deadly pathogen.

August 18, 2011

A scientist at the Gladstone Institutes has discovered how a gene known as SIRT3 contributes to a suite of health problems sweeping across America, offering new insight into how to combat these potentially fatal conditions.

July 11, 2011

The Gladstone Institutes will receive funds totaling $5.6 million over five years as part of the first-ever major funding initiative focusing on HIV eradication. The funds will help three principal investigators at Gladstone, an independent biomedical-research organization, to explore the molecular basis for HIV latency where the virus that causes AIDS “hides” dormant within cells waiting for an opportunity to reemerge when therapy is withdrawn.

July 1, 2011

The Gladstone Institutes has been named America's best place to work in academia, capping a seven-year stint in which readers of The Scientist have ranked the independent biomedical-research organization among academia's top ten places to work.

March 9, 2011

The Gladstone Institutes, a leading biomedical-research organization, today announced its participation in a bold new consortium intended to help the global community better identify, prevent and treat outbreaks of new or re-emerging viruses.

December 1, 2010

For the AIDS community, Thanksgiving came a bit early this year, and after many difficult years, three announcements give hope and reason for celebration during this year's World AIDS Day. First, the UNAIDS reported that the pandemic might have crested, and second, two studies from the Gladstone Institutes showed the first evidence that HIV infection can be prevented by drugs and solved a long-standing mystery about how HIV destroys the immune system.

November 24, 2010

Scientists at Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology have solved a long-standing mystery about HIV infection—namely how HIV promotes the death of CD4 T cells. It is the loss of this critical subset of immune cells that leads to the development of AIDS. Most immune cells that die during HIV infection are seemingly not infected, a phenomenon formerly described as “bystander cell killing.” Now the Gladstone scientists report that these “bystander” cells are actually the victims of a failed or abortive form of viral infection. Their findings are published in today's issue of the journal Cell.